A chart that tracks heart rate zones
fitness

How to Find Your Heart Rate Zones Using Your Maximum Heart Rate

Perhaps one element of heart health worth understanding — that few do — is your different heart rate zones. Whether your maximum heart rate can be utilized to calculate heart rate zones, and thus provide a more exact method of determining exercise intensity as opposed to relying on perceived exertion alone.

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What is VO2 max: a bicycle and a cyclist's legs
fitness

What Is VO2 Max and How Can You Increase It?

Rarely does one explore the world of physical fitness and exercise training without hearing the puzzling phrase “VO2 max.” Utilized by both professional athletes and casual competitors alike, VO2 max is believed to be one of the greatest indicators of an individual’s endurance. But what exactly is it? And if elevated levels of it lead to a higher quality of life, how can we increase it?

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fitness

The Role Adrenaline Plays in Road Races

Why do the starting lines of races sound like dance parties? They’re stimulating adrenaline. We explain the role of adrenaline when pushing your body to the limit—whether that be an ultra marathon or leg day.

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fitness

How to optimize your cardio routine

Our helpful chart breaks down target heart rate and maximum heart rate by age, but how else can you optimize your cardio routine? We discuss the roles intensity and variability can play in your cardio routine.

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fitness

6 stretches you should do every day

Research has found that performing static stretching after a workout can improve range of motion around your joints. Stretching has also been found to improve blood circulation, boost oxygen levels, help deliver nutrients to your muscles, as well as relieve stress and tension.

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fitness

Swimming: Take a Dip in the Fountain of Youth and Other Benefits

An Indiana University study indicated that older swimmers typically had lower blood pressure, improved cholesterol levels (especially HDL), better aerobic capacity, healthier central nervous system, maintained better cognitive functioning, and maintained more muscle mass than their non-swimming peers.

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